Áudio Analógico de Portugal
Bem vindo / Welcome / Willkommen / Bienvenu

Áudio Analógico de Portugal

A paixão pelo Áudio


Fórum para a preservação e divulgação do áudio analógico, e não só...
 
InícioPortalCalendárioPublicaçõesFAQGruposRegistrar-seConectar-se
Fórum para a preservação e divulgação do áudio analógico, e não só...

Compartilhe | 
 

 Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita

Ver o tópico anterior Ver o tópico seguinte Ir em baixo 
AutorMensagem
lpg
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 307
Data de inscrição : 08/09/2011

MensagemAssunto: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Qui Jun 26 2014, 14:00

Recentemente levantou-se num outro tópico a seguinte questão: Pode um pré de phono atenuar o ruído de superfície e os "clicks&pops" apresentando a música de forma exemplar em toda a gama de frequências?

Pela minha pesquisa e experiência com o Avid Pulsus a resposta é sem qualquer espécie de dúvida, sim!

Ora ao que parece (e não sendo eu técnico) a coisa está dependente da abordagem de concepção do pré e a chave está na amplitude da largura de banda (frequência) do amp e velocidade de resposta do mesmo.
Ou seja, de forma resumida, se o pré tiver uma largura de banda limitada escondendo o ruído com má concepção entra em "clip" quando lê um "click/pop" e vai suster esse ruído por tempo superior ao tempo real, ampliando assim todos os ruídos..., se o pré tiver grande largura de banda e se for rápido resolve o "click" num ápice e atenua o ruído!

Segue-e a transcrição parcial de um artigo em inglês que tinha perdido que não sendo longo nem curto merece leitura atenta, destacando o paragrafo a bold:

Introducing The Wideband Phono Preamp

Then the electronic noise produced by the op-amp and it's supporting circuit components must be carefully considered. In fact, low-noise is the overriding factor in moving coil phono preamp design. And thereby hangs the problem - a sort of "catch-22" or "devil in the detail" problem that mostly cancels-out all the high frequency benefits of using moving-coil. The simple fact is, that surrounded as we are with all sorts of technological "miracles", there is still no way you can have both the low-noise electronics required for such a low output device, and high frequency electronics at the same time or in the same place. As people my age may remember the saying "you can't have your cake and eat it!" A low noise circuit can't do the high frequencies that vinyl reproduction requires to sound outstandingly good. The most you will ever get is an acceptable musical performance, and unless your vinyl is virgin, it will be bedeviled by scratches, clicks and pops. However, if you talk to owners who've invested lots of money into their moving coil ownership, they may tell you otherwise - wouldn't you? - To save your embarrassment?

But all is not lost: By carefully trading-off some of the noise performance for improved high frequency performance, things can be improved, if you have the knowledge. Vinyl surface noise (excluding scratches, crackles and pops) is approximately 58 decibels below the record's maximum output. You may think that's a pretty horrible signal to noise ratio, and yes it would be if it were not for the fact that in analogue audio you can hear signal below the noise floor. Conversely, with digital, the noise floor has to be extremely low, because below it you can't hear anything - there's nothing there - it's like looking into a pond of milk. With vinyl which is analogue, the analogy is like looking into a pond of slightly dirty water - you can see what's below it.

Most phono preamp designers try very hard to make their phono preamps extremely low-noise so that you can listen to the equipment without a record playing and be impressed by the silence, but is it worth it? After all, the equipment is for playing records - if you want silence, don't play records and turn the volume down.

You see, even with a phono preamp that only does a few dB better than the vinyl itself, the vinyl's surface noise will dominate. If the customer can bring him or herself to live with this situation, which is easy to do - just play records and listen to the music - then the experienced phono preamp designer can trade some of the noise performance for a much better high frequency performance.

Wideband design does the trick! Wideband design isn't new, but is in the main forgotten. This is probably due to poor marketing, and let's face it, getting the devil out of the detail isn't as easy as coining a few words of spin! If you've read this far, I may have a chance of convincing you, but be assured you're now in a minority - most people went away several paragraphs ago.

Wideband design is about extending performance as far as possible up the high frequency end, while still maintaining the all important low frequency end that underpins a musical performance, and everything in between.

Most people think that the frequency response of vinyl is curtailed at 20kHz like it is with CD, but that isn't the case - it extends at full output from the master-tape to 25kHz and thereafter in most cases only rolls-off gradually at 6dB per octave (the signal voltage is only halved on reaching 50kHz), instead of the "brick-wall" characteristic of CD.

The "proof of the pudding" was an event that happened back in the 1970's called quadraphonic sound, the forerunner of today's surround sound. The quadraphonic coded information was recorded commercially between 25kHz and 50kHz - the rear channels were stuck on the "upper deck" to be decoded by the quadraphonic decoder, and that proves that cutting heads are quite capable of reaching 50kHz "flat" (measured after phono preamp equalization), and thereafter the frequency response would only roll-off gradually.

This property of vinyl means that the all-important spatial information defined by the harmonic structure of the music is preserved. These are frequencies we can't hear, but they characterize the shape of the musical waveform producing undertones we can hear. We don't hear the high frequency harmonics in a live performance, but we hear the spatial information contained. Therefore, if these harmonics are reproduced by the phono preamp, we hear that same spatial information and the correct timbre of the musical instruments, and that's what Stereophile reviewer: Michael Fremer, heard from our Elevator EXP/Era Gold Reflex moving coil combination phono preamp in his September 2007 review shortly after hearing the same music played live.

Even if the recording isn't as wideband as this, there is another major benefit of wideband phono preamp design, and that's the marked reduction in record defect noises (clicks, crackles and pops). This is because the wideband phono preamp is capable of resolving higher frequencies than the conventional approach would have. Here is where we coin the phrase "fast phono stage". The reason why we usually hear so much annoying noises from vinyl isn't actually the fault of the vinyl, or the cartridge, or the arm. It is because the typical phono preamp designed, as it is, for lowest possible noise (e.g. hiss) doesn't have the speed to resolve the "clicks" properly and overshoots. When it overshoots it is out of control and can easily "clip" its power rails, and it "rings" or sustains the "click" for far longer than it actually exists. This is because, at the leading edge frequency of the "click", it's output has gone so far out of phase that the preamp becomes a poor form of oscillator waiting to be triggered and that trigger is the "click". In this state, the phono preamp is unstable and the negative feedback which usually controls its behaviour has become positive feedback, and without control, the "click's" amplitude grows rapidly to several times its original size. And that is why you hear so much distracting noise using a low-noise phono preamp! Less is more...?

There is a lot to be gained from designing the phono preamp to trade a slightly poorer noise performance for greater bandwidth. It means that the user is able to play records that would have otherwise been committed to the garbage bin. Manufacturers can no longer use the excuse that you should go out and buy a brand new copy - that option expired many years ago for many of us, and re-mastering suites will say the same. Record cleaners can help, but with a fast phono stage, you'll find yourself playing records more of the time and cleaning them less.
...

Fonte: http://www.co-bw.com/Audio_All_about_phono_preamp.htm

Pelo que foi possível entender o artigo é da autoria da Grahamm Slee mas existem mais marcas de prés com este tipo de concepção pelo que deixo algumas das características chave dos seguintes prés:

Grahamm Slee Reflex (existe em duas versões MM ou MC, nunca consegui ouvir este pré)
Noise at output: MM -68dB / MC -62dB Quasi-peak 20Hz to 20kHz
Distortion: typically MM 0.01% / MC 0.02%
RIAA: 20Hz - 100kHz  MM <0.3dB / MC <0.5dB

Avid Pulsus (o que uso)
Noise: MM<-81dB / MC<-67dB MC
Distortion: < 0.001%
RIAA: 5Hz - 70kHz +/-0.5dB
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
ViciAudio
Membro AAP


Mensagens : 494
Data de inscrição : 13/03/2012
Localização : Usuário BANIDO

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Dom Jun 29 2014, 01:50

Gostava de testar essa teoria comparando esses e outros prés... porque o que a minha experiência indica é que, nos prés como nas células, o que reina é a teoria do lençol... ou se tapa a cabeça, ou se tapam os pés... mas as duas coisas ao mesmo tempo é mesmo muito complicado.

O próprio texto indica: "There is a lot to be gained from designing the phono preamp to trade a slightly poorer noise performance for greater bandwidth." o que já se entende como um compromisso... embora aqui até pareça invertido porque dá a entender que tornando o pré mais ruídoso, ele acaba por reagir melhor aos "cliques e pops"... mas isso parece-me algo rebuscado, embora não impossível.

Até hoje todas as células e prés que ouvi que realmente eram eficazes a limitar o ruído resultante de sujidades ou formação de espiras danificadas, eram também muito eficazes a cortar uma boa parte das frequências do conteúdo musical Sad

Até agora sempre preferi a abordagem de ter a maior transparência possível, mesmo que isso também torne todos os ruídos e defeitos mais audíveis, porque a recompensa em termos de qualidade geral do som e da apresentação musical é muito grande Smile

Mas, o tema é interessante e merece estude e experimentação... nunca se sabe o que anda por aí até se testar e descobrir com os nossos próprios ouvidos Wink
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
FBatista
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 957
Data de inscrição : 21/03/2013
Idade : 39
Localização : Região Saloia

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Dom Jun 29 2014, 12:15

Não querendo desvalorizar a vossa experiência, porque vou dizer algo óbvio : da minha experiência, tenho "varrido" clicks e pops com a lavagem dos discos na Knosti em conjunto com a escova de superfície no momento de reproduzir os discos.

Porém, há pouco tempo experimentei uma agulha cónica (baratucha) e devo dizer que notei acentuar os mesmos clicks e pops. Depreendi que pelo seu assentamento nos sulcos do disco, consegue chegar onde as cerdas da Knosti não chegam. E porventura também onde a minha habitual agulha não chega.

Sortudo eu que prefiro qualquer das agulhas eliptícas que já tive!
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
jpamplifiers
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 608
Data de inscrição : 16/09/2011
Localização : Sintra

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Dom Jun 29 2014, 16:21

lpg escreveu:
Recentemente levantou-se num outro tópico a seguinte questão: Pode um pré de phono atenuar o ruído de superfície e os "clicks&pops" apresentando a música de forma exemplar em toda a gama de frequências?

Pela minha pesquisa e experiência com o Avid Pulsus a resposta é sem qualquer espécie de dúvida, sim!

Ora ao que parece (e não sendo eu técnico) a coisa está dependente da abordagem de concepção do pré e a chave está na amplitude da largura de banda (frequência) do amp e velocidade de resposta do mesmo.
Ou seja, de forma resumida, se o pré tiver uma largura de banda limitada escondendo o ruído com má concepção entra em "clip" quando lê um "click/pop" e vai suster esse ruído por tempo superior ao tempo real, ampliando assim todos os ruídos..., se o pré tiver grande largura de banda e se for rápido resolve o "click" num ápice e atenua o ruído!

Segue-e a transcrição parcial de um artigo em inglês que tinha perdido que não sendo longo nem curto merece leitura atenta, destacando o paragrafo
[/size]

Boas, para mim esta teoria não faz qualquer sentido. Um pré de fono qualquer tem uma largura de banda várias vezes superior à banda de audio, só que neste caso muito especifico ela é limitada pela malha de correção (RIAA) e não podia ser de outra maneira.
De facto o pré de fono é o amplificador com maior distorção de frequencia que existe, mas aqui ela é propositada e indispensavel.Afinal, desde os 20Hz até aos 20Khz existe uma variação de práticamente 40 dbs. A frequencia de 20Khz tem uma atenuação de 19,6 db relativamente à frequencia de 1khz.
Um calculo simples mostra que um risco com 0,05mm de largura existente no sulco do disco onde a agulha se move á razão de 0,5m/s, produz um impulso rectangular (clik) com cerca de 10Khz, que tendo normalmente uma amplitude inferior ao sinal que se quer ouvir ainda sofre uma atenuação de 13,7 db ( riaa 10khz), assim sendo a teoria do (clip)tabem não faz quaquer sentido. jamais o pré atinge o "clip".  
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
lpg
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 307
Data de inscrição : 08/09/2011

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Dom Jun 29 2014, 18:25

ViciAudio escreveu:

...
Mas, o tema é interessante e merece estude e experimentação... nunca se sabe o que anda por aí até se testar e descobrir com os nossos próprios ouvidos Wink

  

jpamplifiers escreveu:


Boas, para mim esta teoria não faz qualquer sentido. ...

Boas, a teoria do wideband não é evidentemente minha, limitei-me, no que respeita aos "clicks&pops", a simplificar da forma que me foi possível a tese apresentada a bold no texto original! (a teoria está em todo o artigo)

Se faz ou não sentido não sei, não sou técnico de electrónica e a minha bitola são os meus ouvidos! De uma coisa estou certo, o Pulsus foi e é um dos melhores prés de phono que já ouvi (no respectivo patamar de preço e com a subjectividade do meu ouvido), o Reflex nunca ouvi mas tenho uma certeza, os prés de ambas as marcas são alvo de excelentes análises a nível mundial..., e para mim isso faz todo o sentido mas sempre depois de os ouvir! Wink
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
jpamplifiers
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 608
Data de inscrição : 16/09/2011
Localização : Sintra

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Dom Jun 29 2014, 20:01

lpg escreveu:
ViciAudio escreveu:

...
Mas, o tema é interessante e merece estude e experimentação... nunca se sabe o que anda por aí até se testar e descobrir com os nossos próprios ouvidos Wink

  

jpamplifiers escreveu:


Boas, para mim esta teoria não faz qualquer sentido. ...

Boas, a teoria do wideband não é evidentemente minha, limitei-me, no que respeita aos "clicks&pops", a simplificar da forma que me foi possível a tese apresentada a bold no texto original! (a teoria está em todo o artigo)

Se faz ou não sentido não sei, não sou técnico de electrónica e a minha bitola são os meus ouvidos! De uma coisa estou certo, o Pulsus foi e é um dos melhores prés de phono que já ouvi (no respectivo patamar de preço e com a subjectividade do meu ouvido), o Reflex nunca ouvi mas tenho uma certeza, os prés de ambas as marcas são alvo de excelentes análises a nível mundial..., e para mim isso faz todo o sentido mas sempre depois de os ouvir! Wink


Olá, eu percebi que a teoria não é sua, apenas sublinhei a sua conclusão (perfeita) sobre o que é dito. Nem sequer disse que não é possivel minimizar os cliks, é sim senhor mas não da forma como é dada a explicação para lá chegar, mas convem ter sempre presente que é apenas a minha opinião, o importante é os ouvidos e a mente já agora. Algo, sempre custa alguma coisa.  

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
PALUSE
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 1384
Data de inscrição : 07/11/2010
Idade : 52
Localização : Vale da Amendoeira.

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Seg Jun 30 2014, 01:40

jpamplifiers escreveu:
lpg escreveu:
Recentemente levantou-se num outro tópico a seguinte questão: Pode um pré de phono atenuar o ruído de superfície e os "clicks&pops" apresentando a música de forma exemplar em toda a gama de frequências?

Pela minha pesquisa e experiência com o Avid Pulsus a resposta é sem qualquer espécie de dúvida, sim!

Ora ao que parece (e não sendo eu técnico) a coisa está dependente da abordagem de concepção do pré e a chave está na amplitude da largura de banda (frequência) do amp e velocidade de resposta do mesmo.
Ou seja, de forma resumida, se o pré tiver uma largura de banda limitada escondendo o ruído com má concepção entra em "clip" quando lê um "click/pop" e vai suster esse ruído por tempo superior ao tempo real, ampliando assim todos os ruídos..., se o pré tiver grande largura de banda e se for rápido resolve o "click" num ápice e atenua o ruído!

Segue-e a transcrição parcial de um artigo em inglês que tinha perdido que não sendo longo nem curto merece leitura atenta, destacando o paragrafo
[/size]

Boas, para mim esta teoria não faz qualquer sentido. Um pré de fono qualquer tem uma largura de banda várias vezes superior à banda de audio, só que neste caso muito especifico ela é limitada pela malha de correção (RIAA) e não podia ser de outra maneira.
De facto o pré de fono é o amplificador com maior distorção de frequencia que existe, mas aqui ela é propositada e indispensavel.Afinal,  desde os 20Hz até aos 20Khz  existe uma variação de práticamente 40 dbs. A frequencia de 20Khz tem uma atenuação de 19,6 db relativamente à frequencia de 1khz.
Um calculo simples mostra que um risco com 0,05mm de largura existente no sulco do disco onde a agulha se move á razão de 0,5m/s, produz um impulso rectangular (clik) com cerca de 10Khz, que tendo normalmente uma amplitude inferior ao sinal que se quer ouvir ainda sofre uma atenuação de 13,7 db ( riaa 10khz), assim sendo a teoria do (clip)tabem não faz quaquer sentido.  jamais o pré atinge o "clip".  

 Orquestra 
Estou completamente de acordo!

  
Aproveito para deixar uma pequena "graça":

"Querem reduzir o ruído de superfície que emana da banda média alta aos agudos? Baixem a impedância de carga nas "cabeças" ou encontrem um perfil de agulha que extraia mais informação útil das espiras."

Cumprimentos
 
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
ViciAudio
Membro AAP


Mensagens : 494
Data de inscrição : 13/03/2012
Localização : Usuário BANIDO

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Seg Jun 30 2014, 01:56

Também me parece que provavelmente o caminho mais "correcto" e com menos efeitos secundários nocivos para atacar a questão do ruído de reprodução de discos de vinil deverá passar, essencialmente, pela escolha do corte ou perfil do diamante que tenha características que permitam recolher informação musical de uma zona da espira que esteja menos susceptível a ter estrago ou factores que provocam os ditos ruídos...

Tudo o que seja feito depois desse ponto, pelo menos assim me parece, será sempre uma situação de compromisso na manipulação da informação que já foi recolhida. E isso... é complicadíssimo, nunca conheci forma de fazer isso que não cause danos paralelos significativos ao problema que se propõe resolver.

E contra mim falo porque eu, até este momento, tenho optado por outra abordagem... tenho uma célula muito "expressiva" que apesar de fazer um tracking quase imaculado é extremamente sensível aos factores que provocam ruído, sujidade, riscos, espiras mal-formadas, etc etc... mas o reverso dessa "desvantagem" é uma apresentação sonora de transparência fora do normal, som cheio e completo, com uma rapidez de resposta acima do normal, factores que para mim são essenciais para se apreciar a música. Como faço para fugir ao ruído? Bom, para começar uns 75% dos meus discos foram comprados novos, e os 25% de discos usados nunca estão em estado menos do que um verdadeiro Excelente ou "Near MINT", ou seja só toca ali material novo ou como novo. Além disso, quase todos os discos são boas edições ou pelo menos a melhor prensagem disponível para cada caso. E para finalizar, todos os discos sem excepção são lavados pelo menos uma vez na máquina Record Cleaning Machine profissional (com aspiração) com os melhores produtos/líquidos do mercado e usando um método bastante eficaz (apesar de demorado). Dá trabalho? Sim... Vale a pena? Sim! Resulta sempre sempre sempre? Não... mas quando resulta, quase sempre, é o paraíso! Very Happy
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
António José da Silva
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 64407
Data de inscrição : 02/07/2010
Idade : 51
Localização : Quinta do Anjo

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Seg Jun 30 2014, 11:01

Como já dito por alguns, também acho que o problema se resolve na origem. Quero dizer com isto o seguinte. Discos usados em bom estado ou novos, todos eles lavados para retirar lixo, seja da idade seja da prensagem, e em simultâneo anular a estática. Boas inners sleeves que como sabemos não têm forçosamente que ser caras, e um bom manuseamento do nosso ouro negro. Pode parecer complicado, mas depois de metodizado os passos, a coisa torna-se bem simples.

_________________
Digital Audio - Like Reassembling A Cow From Mince  


If what I'm hearing is colouration, then bring on the whole rainbow...


The essential thing is not knowledge, but character.
Joseph Le Conte
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
lpg
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 307
Data de inscrição : 08/09/2011

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Seg Jun 30 2014, 13:03

Pelo que entendi do texto a teoria de concepção de prés wideband tem como principal objectivo a entrega de um resultado sónico superior a outros modelos de concepção (de frequência limitada ou próxima ao espectro audível), a atenuação dos ruídos de superfície será sempre um resultado paralelo e secundário à concepção wideband.

Abri o tópico porque acho o tema verdadeiramente curioso e o assunto ficou perdido no forum. O caminho da teoria à prática é longo, e é claro que o texto citado não dá (nem de perto nem de longe) a receita para fazer o bolo..., no entanto imagino que seja complexo “resolver” um pré de phono (de qualidade!) com grande largura de banda mantendo o ruído e a distorção em valores francamente reduzidos, seja ele ss ou válvulado...! Essa equação fica para análise e debate dos entendidos na matéria, eu limito-me a ouvir musica e a adquirir equipamentos que me agradam ao ouvido (quando tenho “tempo” para isso)...

Saliento ainda que o que me levou a adquirir o pré foi a inteligência da apresentação sónica da gama baixa, média e alta de forma neutra (o que é raro), o palco, a firmeza, rapidez e dinâmica estendida, com uma transparência total nada agressiva e com carácter válvulado (o que também é raro nos SS's).
A atenuação dos ruídos de superfície foi um efeito secundário que notei quando fiz a audição ao pré no meu sistema, não tinha problemas de maior mas é um facto que notei essa atenuação e vim assim confirmar aquilo que já tinha lido em tempos.

Como nota final tenho de deixar claro que constato e defendo que o sistema a montante do pré tem toda a importância na redução do ruído de superfície (gira-discos, braço, célula, alinhamento, tracking da agulha e estado do disco...)! Ou seja o efeito secundário de um pré wideband (bem concebido) não faz milagres no que respeita a clicks&pops!
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
lpg
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 307
Data de inscrição : 08/09/2011

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Qua Jul 02 2014, 14:30

Mais um para a lista, neste caso em versão Ultra Wideband:

Soulution 750 Phono-Stage, da Soulution Audio

ps. Consta que é um dos melhores prés hi-end que existem mas com preço ultra absurdo, Pré+Psu=32K$)..., gostava de o ouvir mas só para confirmar a reputação...
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
António José da Silva
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 64407
Data de inscrição : 02/07/2010
Idade : 51
Localização : Quinta do Anjo

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Qua Jul 02 2014, 15:43

Mais um que segundo diz é wideband.



http://www.dynavector.com/products/amp/e_p75mk2.html

_________________
Digital Audio - Like Reassembling A Cow From Mince  


If what I'm hearing is colouration, then bring on the whole rainbow...


The essential thing is not knowledge, but character.
Joseph Le Conte
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
lpg
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 307
Data de inscrição : 08/09/2011

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Qua Jul 02 2014, 19:54

António José da Silva escreveu:
Mais um que segundo diz é wideband.
http://www.dynavector.com/products/amp/e_p75mk2.html

Em tempos ouvi o DV P75mk2, é um ss muito razoável e com som natural para a gama de preço, pareceu-me ter algum "roll-off" na gama baixa (que afecta a média baixa) reduzindo o impacto geral, dependendo do sistema poderá casar bem ou mal. O modo PE aparenta dar mais "transparência" ás células MC da marca mas não cheguei a perceber se o modo resulta em sabor artificial ou não.

Na minha opinião, e na mesma gama de preços, o Avid Pellar será superior mas o ajuste do load das MC é feito com plugs RCA em portas para o efeito e não em jumpers.
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
António José da Silva
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 64407
Data de inscrição : 02/07/2010
Idade : 51
Localização : Quinta do Anjo

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Qua Jul 02 2014, 19:57

lpg escreveu:
António José da Silva escreveu:
Mais um que segundo diz é wideband.
http://www.dynavector.com/products/amp/e_p75mk2.html

Em tempos ouvi o DV P75mk2, é um ss muito razoável e com som natural para a gama de preço, pareceu-me ter algum "roll-off" na gama baixa (que afecta a média baixa) reduzindo o impacto geral, dependendo do sistema poderá casar bem ou mal. O modo PE aparenta dar mais "transparência" ás células MC da marca mas não cheguei a perceber se o modo resulta em sabor artificial ou não.

Na minha opinião, e na mesma gama de preços, o Avid Pellar será superior mas o ajuste do load das MC é feito com plugs RCA em portas para o efeito e não em jumpers.


As poucas vezes que o ouvi, pareceu-me bastante porreiro.

_________________
Digital Audio - Like Reassembling A Cow From Mince  


If what I'm hearing is colouration, then bring on the whole rainbow...


The essential thing is not knowledge, but character.
Joseph Le Conte
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
lpg
Membro AAP
avatar

Mensagens : 307
Data de inscrição : 08/09/2011

MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   Qua Jul 02 2014, 20:16

António José da Silva escreveu:

As poucas vezes que o ouvi, pareceu-me bastante porreiro.

Só o ouvi uma vez mas arrisco dizer que o DV é superior aos Lehmann ou Trichord da mesma gama, e de certa forma estes últimos também padecem da mesma espécie de roll-off na baixa...
Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
Conteúdo patrocinado




MensagemAssunto: Re: Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita   

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo
 
Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita
Ver o tópico anterior Ver o tópico seguinte Voltar ao Topo 
Página 1 de 1
 Tópicos similares
-
» Prés de Phono vs Batata Frita
» Após lavar os discos na knosti a batata frita continua
» Pré-amplificador Phono e mais...
» Pré com phono Yaquin MS-12B
» Pré de Phono...

Permissão deste fórum:Você não pode responder aos tópicos neste fórum
Áudio Analógico de Portugal :: Phono Geral-
Ir para: